Disabled Teen Gang-raped by Students

So shocking that the teachers did fuck all for the student that was being raped! /sarcasm

A 15-year-old girl with an IQ lower than 60 has had a lawsuit filed on her behalf Jan. 11 which alleges that she was gang-raped and nearly sodomized by two male students, and that school officials at Martin De Porres Academy in Elmont, New York knew about the attack and did nothing.

The girl, who is only known by court records as K.J., was the only girl in a class of 13. Because of her special education needs, the state of New York allows juvenile delinquents to attend class with non-offending, but mentally disabled, students. Such was the case with K.J.’s attackers who were both currently housed in Casa De La Salle, a home for juvenile delinquents.

K.J. was alleged to have been held under her desk, while being beaten in the face and sexually assaulted. What is worse, this all happened while there were 10 other students and two teachers in the classroom. As an example it is alleged that one of the teen-rapists danced on K.J.’s desk, while his partner attempted to anally sodomize her. Eventually K.J. was able to get away, and she waited until the next day to tell a social worker at the school. Nothing was done.

The lawsuit claims K.J.’s mother fought with school officials for months, during which she endured countless episodes of abuse and bullying. In a documented instance published by New York Daily News in early December the school placed K.J. alone in a room with one of her attackers so they could “discuss” their problems. The talk ended with K.J. leaving with facial lacerations. Again, no criminal action was taken.

Finally, months after the sexual assault, K.J. was allowed to be transfered to a different school.

Ed Dana, the Executive director of Martin De Porres claims that they fired the teachers involved, and that they take bullying very seriously.

This Should Not Need To Happen

A 12 year old boy is considered criminally responsible for the “second-degree murder” of his 32 year old father who happens to be a white supremacist. You would think that the court of law would be more sympathetic to the boy since he and his stepmother were being violently abused by him. That is not it though, apparently their argument is that the murder was pre-meditated and that he knew what he was doing. I would have liked to ask the judge and jury why they would convict a minor who had every good reason to murder the scumbag. Obviously, the fact that this man abused his child and wife wasn’t enough of a good reason to let him go. Article Here.

California judge found Monday that a boy was responsible for the second-degree murder of his white supremacist father when the defendant was just 10.

Prosecutors had argued at trial that the boy, now 12, knew what he was doing when he shot 32-year-old Jeff Hall — a regional leader of the National Socialist Movement — and the slaying was premeditated.

Defense attorney Matthew Hardy countered that his client grew up in an abusive and violent environment and learned it was acceptable to kill people who were a threat. Hardy contended the boy thought if he shot his dad, the violence would end.

The boy, who is not being identified by The Associated Press because of his age, did not testify at the trial.

Riverside Superior Court Judge Jean Leonard heard the case without a jury.

Leonard said in the ruling that the killing was planned by the boy but noted the amount of abuse he suffered at the hands of his father had an effect on his life.

“This was not a complex killing,” Leonard said. “He thought about the idea and shot his father.”

The boy showed no emotion when the judge gave her ruling. A sentencing hearing was set for Feb. 15. He could be jailed until he is 23.

Prosecutors argued that the child killed his father to keep him from splitting up with his stepmother, who initially said she had killed Hall but then quickly retracted her statement. She was not charged in the case.

The boy’s younger sister bolstered the prosecution’s case by saying her elder sibling plotted the shooting days in advance.

Hall was shot at point-blank range with a .357 Magnum while he slept on a sofa in the family home.

The boy said in a videotaped interview with police that he didn’t think he’d get in trouble because he saw an episode of “Criminal Minds” in which a child killed an abusive father and wasn’t arrested.

Prosecutors maintained Hall’s white supremacist beliefs had nothing to do with the crime. They noted the boy had a history of violence that dated back to kindergarten when he stabbed a teacher with a pencil.

Hardy said he hopes the boy, if convicted, would not be sent to a juvenile lockup but rather be placed in a private facility that offers therapy, medical treatment and schooling.

Spanking is Abuse! Why Am I not Surprised?

By Barbara Bronson Gray
HealthDay Reporter
MONDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) —
Spanking or slapping your children may increase the odds that they will develop mental health issues that plague them in adulthood, a new study suggests.

Researchers in Canada found that up to 7 percent of a range of mental health disorders were associated with physical punishment, including spanking, shoving, grabbing or hitting, during childhood.

“We’re not talking about just a tap on the bum,” said study author Tracie Afifi, an assistant professor in the department of community health sciences at the University of Manitoba, in Winnipeg.
“We were looking at people who used physical punishment as a regular means to discipline their children.”

Corporal punishment was associated with increased odds of anxiety and mood disorders, including major depression, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, agoraphobia and social phobia. Several personality disorders and alcohol and drug abuse were also linked to physical punishment, the researchers found.

“What’s really important is to know that spanking and other forms of physical punishment come at a cost,” said Afifi. “Physical punishment should not be used on children at any age under any circumstances.”

While the study finds an association between physical punishment and mental illness, it does not prove that one causes the other.

Previous studies have linked physical punishment to aggression in children, delinquency and emotional, developmental and behavioral impairment. But this study examined its effects on mental health in the absence of more severe physical abuse, sexual abuse or other forms of neglect and mistreatment.

For the study, published online July 2 in the journal Pediatrics, the researchers used 2004-2005 data on about 34,000 individuals aged 20 or older gathered from the U.S. National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Participants were questioned face-to-face and asked, on a scale of “never” to “very often,” how often they were ever pushed, grabbed, shoved, slapped or hit by their parents or another adult living their home. Those who reported “sometimes” or greater were considered as having experienced harsh physical punishment.

About 6 percent of respondents were considered to have suffered harsh physical punishment. Boys, blacks and those from more educated, more affluent families were most likely to report such abuse, the researchers said.

The researchers adjusted the data to take into account socio-demographic factors and any family history of dysfunction.

Thirty-two countries prohibit physical punishment of children by parents or caregivers, but the practice is legal in the United States and Canada, according to background information in the study. The American Academy of Pediatrics strongly recommends against the use of physical punishment as a form of child discipline.

Nevertheless, the researchers say a survey of U.S. adults showed that 48 percent of respondents reported a history of harsh physical punishment without more severe abuse. A 2010 University of North Carolina study revealed that nearly 80 percent of preschool children in the United States are spanked.

Some experts support the notion that harsh discipline can negatively affect kids but express concerns about the specific implications of this new study.

“While it’s a well-done study, looking at a national data sample, there are limitations in the way the study was done,” said Dr. Andrew Adesman, chief of developmental and behavioral pediatrics at Steven and Alexandra Cohen Children’s Medical Center in New Hyde Park, N.Y. “There are limitations to relying on adults recalling childhood experiences, and it’s hard to control for familial psychopathology.”

Adesman added that while the research reinforces that there are now more good reasons not to use physical punishment, “we can’t infer that physical punishment leads to major psychological disorders.”

Still, Adesman said the public needs more education about the dangers of physical punishment to children and the alternatives that parents can effectively use.

“There’s a general presumption that parenting comes naturally, but there are things people need to learn. We have PSAs [public service announcements] about all kinds of health issues, but I’ve yet to hear any tips for providing non-physical punishment to children.”

Article here

Destroying Capitalism and the State (and many other issues which are caused by the State)

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